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Robert Enders

I would certainly agree that people should not be allowed to drive under the influence of K2. Since it is a depressant, it would slow reaction times.

In this case, the young man did not die because of slow reaction times. He died because he made the dangerous decision to flee from the police. While my heart goes out to this woman for her loss, there is no data that suggests that a person under the influence of K2 is anymore likely to flee from the police than a person under the influence of alcohol.

Usually when someone tries to run from law enforcement, it is because they have already done something else that is illegal. So making K2 illegal would make K2 users even more likely to try to bolt.

We need to teach our kids not to do drugs, but anecdotal hyperbole will cause them to take us less seriously. No matter how dangerous a substance is, some idiot is going to try it and then tell his friends about it if he survives the experience. If you say that K2 will kill anyone who smokes it, then anyone who smokes it and lives strikes a blow to your credibility. We have to clearly state the risks and effects of drugs, but we must not exaggerate those risks.

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