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« New York Times: Ignore the man on the left | Main | Recount - Expectation is December 17th »

Comments

brian stouder

Thanks for the link. If you read the comments after the article, you'll find that about three quarters of them are harsh and hostile - which isn't surprising, but IS nonetheless disappointing.

If I had to run an internet site - especially one associated with an institution with a wide public reputation (such as the Indianapolis Star) - I would certainly emulate the FWOb rule against anonymous comments.

One would profit more from reading the graffiti on the bathroom walls at the Indianpolis Motor Speedway, rather than the unmoderated (and ill-conceived) frippery on the Indy Star website

brian stouder

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/99999999/COLUMNISTS07/70819001/1040/COLUMNISTS07

Looks like the Indy Star just posted a reminder to their posters - altough related to another discussion (about a soldier who lost his life)

One blithe sentence near the beginning says

"We allow Web users to post, anonymously, their own comments with our stories."

But why? Why allow anonymity?


another paragraph says

"But we've discovered TalkBack also provides something else: an opportunity for the hateful to express themselves to a wide audience, after years of being largely suppressed by the majority of civil society. As one member of The Star's reader advisory council put it some weeks ago, we unintentionally are providing a "bathroom wall" for expression."

and, a key passage says

"TalkBack is enormously popular. Last month nearly 100,000 Talkback comments were posted. They received 3 million page views.
We do not review each of those 100,000 items, but we do spot-check the site throughout the day. We review comments flagged as offensive by users and last month removed about 2,000 of them."

So the good news is, they do seem to be aware that they have a bit of a knucklehead problem.


Tom Fox

I worked for Julia Carson in the 1981 session of the state legislature. I was a college student working as an intern for the Democratic minority in the senate and she was a second term senator from Indianapolis. Although her politics and mine weren't always the same, I grew to respect her and admire the way she stood up for what she thought was right. She was a vigorous advocate for her district and for her point of view. I kept in touch with her for several years after that interhship, but unfortunately, over the past several years, we've not maintained contact. However, I know she took the same vigor and passion to Washington that she had in the state senate all those years ago. I'm saddened to hear of her condition. When Julia Carson goes, it will be a loss to her constituents and to the Congress.

Denny Rorick

I will not forget her talk at the 2006 State Democratic Convention. Allowed 5 minutes she went on for over 20 minutes while the powers that be tried to get her to stop and she held them off with a wave of her hand. She received the longest and loudest applause many if not all would have gladly listened to her for another 20 minutes. She had the convention goers, at times laughing, near tears, cheering and also silent. What a beatiful women. Always respectful but oh what spunk and how she could speak her mind.I can only offer up a prayer for her and thank her for all she has done for Indiana and America.

Karen Goldner

I agree with Denny that Congresswoman Carson was the highlight of the 2006 convention - she was amazing. Her life gives everyone reason to believe in the American dream. Prayers to the Congresswoman and her family.

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