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Steve "Tiny" Michaels

And who is paying the $18 million pricetag? Tell me it's the Quayle family, or their foundation's board, and not Huntington University.

Presidential (and Vice-Presidential) museums have usually been noted as being forgettable, except to the person the museum is about. To paraphrase John Nance Garner, "The Vice-Presidential museum isn't worth a bucket of warm spit." It sure as heck isn't worth an $18 million dollar investment...even if moving it to a more prominent place on US 24 improves the visibility....

Mitch Harper

I don't believe that funding has been determined. However, I doubt that talks would be progressing this far if there were not some private donors willing to underwrite some of the costs.

Understand, the Quayle Center is much more than a museum to Dan Quayle and to other Vice-Presidents. It is the repository of his Vice-Presidential papers and it is likely that the Center will be receiving more archival documents related to other Vice-Presidents.

I don't believe the University would be considering this proposal unless it thought that there were a real possibility of this strengthening the scholarly purposes of the University.

Huntington University has a strong history program. The addition of something that would function as a repository of documents to support scholarly research by academics from around the country is an interesting idea.

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